Aug 5, 2013

Ancient Ephesus: Terrace Houses

[If you're visiting from the fabulous Eat Yourself Skinny blog, WELCOME, FRIENDS!! I'm currently recapping the 12-day Mediterranean cruise my husband and I took this past May--you can play catchup here. I hope you'll have a look and stay awhile! And if you wanna know more about yours truly...here's a good place to start! Happy Monday!]


The Terrace Houses, located within the ruins of ancient Ephesus, were once the fanciest houses in all of Turkey. Only the most rich and elite Ephesians were residents here in the 6 units (with 3 expansive terraces--hense the name) tucked into the lower slope of Bulbul Mountain. Today, what remains of the Terrace Houses is covered entirely by a milky white dome of fiberglass, designed to protect the ruins from the elements, including the hot Turkish summers. The houses are constantly in a state of restoration, which was evident by couplets of archeologists, excavators, and researchers huddled around various parts of the units. The scope and scale of the excavation and restoration process is quite impressive. The colorful marble walls are slowly being pieced back together in most rooms, but some sections still remained fully intact. As you walked from room to room, level to level, it was easy to see that no ordinary families lived here thousands of years ago. The mosaic tiled floors and uncommon terracotta plumbing lines showed that inhabitants of these apartments were far from void of luxuriousness, at least where the ancient world is concerned. For an extra fee of about 15 Turkish Lira, you too can wander through the homes of Ephesus' rich and famous during your visit to the ruins. Unlike the crumbles of stone and marble outside, the Terraces Houses shed light on the more complex lives of ancient Ephesians. These apartments are not to be missed!


You can find more from our visit to Ephesus here.

9 comments:

  1. I did not go in the museum when I was there but now I wish I did!

    xx
    Kelly
    Sparkles and Shoes

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  2. Wow this is incredible! Whenever I think of Turkey I only think of holiday resorts because thats pretty much all people from England go and do there. This would be much cooler.

    Dannielle | Chic-a-Dee

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  3. Wow! I cannot believe how well preserved they are - it's amazing to think that they're being unearthed in such good condition. What an incredible experience... something added to my ever-expanding bucket list :)

    xxx
    Jenna

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  4. wow that is so great that everything is almost intacted. You can see the paintings that they did on the walls, wow. I wish I could go and see that too. What a great experience you are having it almost made me cry because of all the care that they take in preserving this. The pillars, the floors, and when I looked at the picture you too of the houses I was floored, wow again. Thank you for the pictures I'm going to keep this for my daughter to see she will love looking at the pictures.

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  5. Oh my what a bloody marvellous post, each photo had me going ohh or ahhhhh just so great......thank you for sharing these you do not know uplifting I find your blog

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    Replies
    1. Thank you so much, Jo-Anne! You don't know how much that means to me! I look forward to your comments all the time...you're always so sweet! :)

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  6. Oh sweet jesus I need to go here! Studied this stuff in university!

    Lesley / bytheporchlight.com

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